Artificial Intelligence in the Fashion Domain

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is taking over the fashion industry and it is yet to be seen how it will influence merchandiser experiences, advertising campaigns, e-commerce yield and even the apparels themselves. Machine-learning is already extensively used in fashion where algorithms assist several businesses and administer backend processes, specifically in retail and inventory distribution.

As online shopping continues to flourish, it is essential for businesses to use instruments that can help them entice and retain clienteles. AI can do this in a myriad of ways including reinforcing ecommerce by trailing users’ favorites and providing them with a personalized shopping experience. “Thread, a startup that infuses AI with human intelligence and offers what some consider a chic service, revolves around the fashion instincts of designers and an algorithm to assist people while shopping. Thread clienteles fill a brief online survey and then are paired with a stylist who analyses their information and gets a sense of the customer’s style. The stylist then uses Thread’s branded algorithm to categorize through thousands of merchandises and puts together an outfit for purchase.

AI vs. Counterfeiting

International Anti Counterfeiting Council (IACC) data reveals that 55.7 million with AI value of $250 billion of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR)-related seizures were recorded in 2014. Yet, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data indicates that searching for genuine products in the universal $460 billion counterfeit industry is not an easy task, and purchasers on the search for top-notch clothing at a reduced price regularly obtain well-preserved second-hand pieces online.

AI systems are proficient at interpreting databases and constructing numerous evaluations concurrently. IBM Watson is a question answering computer system that can respond to questions asked in natural language. At OpenAI, the artificial intelligence lab founded by Tesla’s chief executive, Elon Musk, machines are coaching themselves to behave like humans. In a broad-spectrum, AI comprises contrasting quantitative statistics from authentic items to those of potential fakes in the fashion industry. Thereby, AI would be a system highly suitable for identifying counterfeit products.

 

  • Nurturing Visual Data to an AI Algorithm

Stitch Fix, the Silicon Valley subscription box service, operates genetic algorithms and AI to design outfits its clienteles desired, but that the brands it works with weren’t offering. Stitch Fix takes data on its user’s style preferences, items kept from each delivery or “fix,” feedback on returned items and social media posts, and then feeds it into its algorithm. Others are concentrating further down the supply chain. Justin MacFarlane, Macy’s Inc. chief strategy, analytics and innovation officer, said, “There is a lot of noise out there in terms of artificial intelligence, machine learning and the focus is on pricing, inventory and the customer.” AI doesn’t have a style, but it can take bits and bytes from everywhere and come up with unexpected design combinations. “The future of design is about human-machine collaboration,” MacFarlane said. “And ultimately humans must decide the difference between whether an idea is fashionable — or a Franken-style.”

Entrupy is an enterprise that sells a microscopic camera system that is positioned on the alleged fake merchandise and passes captured images to an AI algorithm. This algorithm creates reviews alongside an archive of genuine merchandises to determine if the alleged article is genuine or not. Entrupy‘s patented technology is claimed to be used by several secondary retailers and bazaars to validate handbags and wallets from brands comprising Louis Vuitton, Chanel.

 

  • GPU-Accelerated Computing

Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-accelerated computing is another instance that uses innovative counterfeit identification. Cypheme is a company that uses a stimulating system for counterfeit recognition that relies on collaboration with producers of genuine merchandises. These producers are required to combine a traceable paper with an explicit design on the merchandise packaging. Then, any smartphone with the Cypheme app can be used to take photographs of the packaging and the 8 megapixel camera will recognize distinctive granules on the traceable paper. Herein, in order to establish the genuineness as well as the date of production the granule information is then sent to an AI algorithm, powered by NVIDIA GPUs all in seconds.

 

  • Personalized service and the human side of AI

In the retail industry, several examples fall under the umbrella of AI. eBay’s ShopBot is an AI powered private shopping assistant on Facebook Messenger that assists users locate the top deals and filter through over a billion listings. Also, Amazon’s Alexa reply to voice cues; and robots are superseding information stalls in stores like Lowe’s in the United States.  A constant machine-learning customer service experience is offered by live chat functions on retailers’ websites, which are known for substituting staff with “24/7-on robots.” It is still the primary stages of AI and the future of this space looks even more AI-enabled.

From glamorous wearable and collaborative dressing rooms to robots walking the Chanel runway, fashion has always taken the cutting-edge in chic-tech developments. AI systems can operate as an interaction system to update an audience on collection announcements and product accessibility. It can offer communicating storytelling and exclusive digital experiences with the support of innovative algorithms. These are all things the fashion domain frantically wants and desires.


Krati Jain earned her Master of Laws (LLM) in Intellectual Property from George Washington University Law School. She also has bachelor’s degree in Psychology & Human Resource Management (B.Sc Hons) and has earned her first Law degree (L.L.B.) from British universities in the UAE and UK. Krati is passionate about fashion law and is interested in advancing sustainability and ethics in the fashion industry. Also, she is an ardent cricket player and loves to try new cuisines.

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Krati Jain earned her Master of Laws (LLM) in Intellectual Property from George Washington University Law School. She also has bachelor's degree in Psychology & Human Resource Management (B.Sc Hons) and has earned her first Law degree (L.L.B.) from British universities in the UAE and UK. Krati is passionate about fashion law and is interested in advancing sustainability and ethics in the fashion industry. Also, she is an ardent cricket player and loves to try new cuisines.